Charles is the Man.Molly is the Woman!

Charles is the Man. Molly is the Woman!

Tuesday, September 18, 2007

video

Saturday, May 06, 2006

Look out Molly!

Saturday, November 05, 2005

When Your Baby Becomes a Big Brother or Sister
by Carol Harding, Your Baby Today

I remember holding our first son in my arms just weeks before his sister was born, knowing that our lives would never be the same again. We had always wanted our children to have siblings, but now it seemed that our precious baby's life was changing much too quickly. Were any of us ready?

How do we prepare our babies to be big brothers and sisters? How do we prepare ourselves to be parents of siblings? We want to have a unique closeness with each child, and we want to raise children who get along with each other. How do we help our children develop special relationships with each other as well as with us, their parents?

Judy Dunn, Distinguished Professor of Human Development at The Pennsylvania State University, has conducted research on brother/sister relationships for several decades. After observing many different brothers and sisters, Dunn and her colleagues reported that most relationships were warm, affectionate, and friendly much of the time. In their book, Siblings: Love, Envy, and Understanding, Dunn and Kendrick reported that more than 95 percent of the older brothers and sisters they observed were eager to help care for the new baby in their family. They also reported that aggressive acts toward the baby were uncommon. This is good news.

Based on the research of Dunn and others, several ways are listed below to help our children become big sisters and brothers.

  • Prepare your child for the new arrival. Adjustment to big brotherhood or sisterhood is easier when it's not a surprise.
  • Share the new baby's caregiving with the older sibling. Even the youngest brother or sister can be "baby's special helper." Supervise carefully, choose tasks appropriately, and have fun together.
  • Be sure your children have time to play with each other (with you close by but not necessarily involved). Shared fantasy play leads to good times together and contributes to warm relationships for life.
  • Encourage your children to share "silly times" with each other (again with you close by but not always involved). In her book, Young Children's Close Relationships, Dunn reported that humor forms one of the best lifelong connections between brothers and sisters.
  • Expect some sibling rivalry. Although rivalry is one of the biggest things parents worry about, it's a normal part of children's "growing pains" and should be curtailed only if it becomes overly hostile or harmful. Interestingly, Dunn observed that preschool children who have frequent conflict with their siblings are particularly likely to share, help, and cooperate.
  • Feelings within the family make a difference. Although children's temperaments (personalities) are important in sister/brother relationships, how parents feel and act towards each other affects how brothers and sisters get along (or don't). When fathers have warm relationships with their children and don't "play favorites" and when both parents perceive their family as close, siblings have more positive relationships and less conflictWhen Your Baby Becomes a Big Brother or Sister
    by Carol Harding, Your Baby Today

    I remember holding our first son in my arms just weeks before his sister was born, knowing that our lives would never be the same again. We had always wanted our children to have siblings, but now it seemed that our precious baby's life was changing much too quickly. Were any of us ready?

    How do we prepare our babies to be big brothers and sisters? How do we prepare ourselves to be parents of siblings? We want to have a unique closeness with each child, and we want to raise children who get along with each other. How do we help our children develop special relationships with each other as well as with us, their parents?

    Judy Dunn, Distinguished Professor of Human Development at The Pennsylvania State University, has conducted research on brother/sister relationships for several decades. After observing many different brothers and sisters, Dunn and her colleagues reported that most relationships were warm, affectionate, and friendly much of the time. In their book, Siblings: Love, Envy, and Understanding, Dunn and Kendrick reported that more than 95 percent of the older brothers and sisters they observed were eager to help care for the new baby in their family. They also reported that aggressive acts toward the baby were uncommon. This is good news.

    Based on the research of Dunn and others, several ways are listed below to help our children become big sisters and brothers.

  • Prepare your child for the new arrival. Adjustment to big brotherhood or sisterhood is easier when it's not a surprise.
  • Share the new baby's caregiving with the older sibling. Even the youngest brother or sister can be "baby's special helper." Supervise carefully, choose tasks appropriately, and have fun together.
  • Be sure your children have time to play with each other (with you close by but not necessarily involved). Shared fantasy play leads to good times together and contributes to warm relationships for life.
  • Encourage your children to share "silly times" with each other (again with you close by but not always involved). In her book, Young Children's Close Relationships, Dunn reported that humor forms one of the best lifelong connections between brothers and sisters.
  • Expect some sibling rivalry. Although rivalry is one of the biggest things parents worry about, it's a normal part of children's "growing pains" and should be curtailed only if it becomes overly hostile or harmful. Interestingly, Dunn observed that preschool children who have frequent conflict with their siblings are particularly likely to share, help, and cooperate.
  • Feelings within the family make a difference. Although children's temperaments (personalities) are important in sister/brother relationships, how parents feel and act towards each other affects how brothers and sisters get along (or don't). When fathers have warm relationships with their children and don't "play favorites" and when both parents perceive their family as close, siblings have more positive relationships and less conflict

Tuesday, September 13, 2005

I dont want to write this. I have been having problems with my heart for the last week.I went to doctor and they did eco and the result was 11% ejection factor. Down from my 15% for the last 5 or 6 years. I am going back in on friday.Its not looking good.I dont have a good feeling about this.

I love you Molly. fuck I dont want to leave this message. Love your brother.If he screws up still love him. All you have in this world is how you treat people. All the rest goes away.

Love Dad.

Sunday, September 04, 2005

I don't think you get it. My heart is enlarged right now.It is messing with my breathing.I don't think I could walk to Safeway with out passing out.You arent taking me seriously. If it doesnt go back I will end up in hospital in a day or 2.

I Love you Molly and Charles.

Wednesday, May 04, 2005

She made it!! MAy 2,2005.

Monday, May 02, 2005

You Can go here to Look!